The High Court Enforcement Officers Association welcomes those who would like to train to become an Authorised High Court Enforcement Officer. This is a two-part process balancing academic study and practical experience. A brief overview of the process can be seen below.

hceoa student pathway

How to become a Student Member

Students must have achieved an academic qualification in law or credit management, or a suitable equivalent, at Level 3 or above. To apply for student membership, a CV, with supporting documents should be sent to the Secretary.

You can do this by email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If it is not entirely clear that you have achieved that level, a copy of your CV will be sent to Chartered Institute of Credit Management (CICM)  for assessment. A fee of £40.00 will be payable for this.

If you have achieved the required level, your application will generally be accepted without any further checks. The Secretary will then send an application form for completion and return with the student membership fee (currently £50.00) and you will then receive a membership number and details of how to access the members’ area of the High Court Enforcement Officers Association website.

A Student Member Return Form (SMR) will be required each year which enables the Secretary to keep up to date with a student’s academic progress by reference to CICM.

Academic study

The CICM Diploma qualification involves eight assignments and one three-hour exam, which is intended to show both theoretical and practical knowledge of the law and practice of enforcement. Further information can be found on the CICM website.

Training Period

A two-year training period with an Associate High Court Enforcement Officer should be undertaken to show practical experience of enforcement and the general skills to operate in a modern office.

A log of work should be kept (see the details required here) and students will need to sit the Level 2 Taking Control of Goods exam (also offered by CICM) to enable them to obtain an Enforcement Agent’s Certificate and to carry out a limited amount of enforcement of Writs of Control and Possession. At the end of the period, the log will be signed off by the Associate High Court Enforcement Officer and referred to a High Court Enforcement Officers Association Board member for review and approval.

Academic study and the training period can run together, and students can aim to be able to move on to the next stage after two years.

How to become an Associate Member

Once a Level 4 Diploma has been achieved and the training log signed off, a student can apply to become an Associate Member. This enables a student to be in a position to apply for authorisation.

How to become an Authorised High Court Enforcement Officer

An application is needed to the Senior Master of the Queen’s Bench Division who is designated by the Lord Chancellor to authorise HCEOs. See the requirements of the High Court Enforcement Officers Regulations 2004 (HCEOR) and the Ministry Guidance Notes for more information.

How to become a Full Member

Once authorised, a High Court Enforcement Officer must apply for full membership, which is a requirement of the High Court Enforcement Officers Regulations 2004. This enables a High Court Enforcement Officer to participate fully in the work of the High Court Enforcement Officers Association as well as the ability to receive Writs of Control and Execution in the High Court Enforcement Officer’s name.

High Court enforcement activity is being undertaken in an appropriate, flexible and sensitive manner that reflects the challenges we are all facing as a result of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

The Association has developed a best practice Covid-19 plan.

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